CTCV Health Watch Committee Report 2014                                                  30/1/2015


Confidentiality

All reports are treated as confidential unless the box, on the Report Form, has been ticked indicating that the owner agrees that the details may be shared

Number of Reports Received

We have received 36 Litter Reports during 2014 and one Medical Report.

Litter Reports

All puppies reported were within the recommended range for normal scores, although a small number of pups required re-testing. One interesting occurrence this year was that bile acid reports were received from a laboratory for an entire litter that were well over the recommended range. The owner of the pups was suspicious that these scores were not correct, particularly as one of the scores was missing. The laboratory would not accept that the scores were flawed, and suggested re-testing in two weeks time. The owner did not accept this and had the pups re-tested three days later, (from the date of the original tests). The second lot of scores were in the normal range, and in fact quite low. The owner was not pleased that no refund was offered nor an explanation received as to how the scores could be so different in just three days time.

(Please note that the flawed test scores are not included in the Data Base Bile Acid Score Report for 2014.)

Medical Reports

One Medical Report was received from the owners of a well-known Grand Champion Show Dog here in Victoria. The owners have kindly agreed to submit the following story of their dog's recovery from the condition known as Polyradiculoneuritis, also known as Coon Hound disease. Their story is as follows:

Toby's Story:

It is hard to believe our male Cairn Terrier Toby (Grand Ch Benannand Double Take) was unable to walk for the best part of 3 months up until 10 days ago. Today (9th Feb) he is walking completely unaided,{ although a little stilted and stiff), but is getting stronger and gaining more stamina each day. When we were asked to write about our experience by the Health committee we decided it would be a great idea to share our story just in case someone else comes across this condition in the future. When dealing with Polyradiculoneuritis you need all the knowledge and encouragement you can get in order to treat and cope with this. We searched the internet for websites and blogs and found there was limited support and information but did find a few personal blogs that helped.

At the start of November 2014, Toby suddenly showed weakness in his hind legs and a subtle change in his bark. Over the next few days the condition progressed which led to total paralysis of all four limbs and total loss of his bark. He was initially tested for a spinal injury (CT scan), tick paralysis (shaved & anti venom), and various other neurological disorders (electromyography and nerve conduction studies). Toby was finally diagnosed by the Neurologists at the Melbourne University Veterinary Hospital as having Idiopathic Polyradiculoneuritis, a serious, unpredictable, life threatening neurological disorder that occurs when many nerves throughout the body malfunction simultaneously. The prognosis is very good but recovery times vary from 2 weeks to 6 months and the only treatment is a huge dose of tender loving nursing care and lots of patience and physiotherapy. The hospital sees almost one case a week of varying degrees affecting all breeds, ages and genders. Toby was considered a fairly severe case so we knew we were probably in for the long haul.

Over the last 3 months we turned our life upside down in order to help Toby recover. There were many disheartening times watching a lively, bubbly dog struck down with this debilitating condition but luckily small improvements were apparent along the way. During the first month we had to hand feed him, take him outside regularly throughout the day and night for toileting, move his positioning often and exercise his limbs several times a day. In December we took Toby to a canine physiotherapist at Dogs in Motion where he had hydrotherapy on an underwater treadmill. We were given a set of exercises to give him several times a day including one session in the bath daily. The physiotherapist Michelle Monk also gave us so much hope and support as she had worked with this condition before and assured us that Toby will walk again! At this stage he still had very little movement in his legs and only limited movement in his neck and trunk and muscle wastage was also a concern
Slowly improvement became more evident with Toby beginning to wriggle his body more and display stronger neck muscles. By Christmas Day he was wagging his tail and moving the top half of his body and by early January he began moving himself in a commando style roll and shuffling along on his elbows. At hydrotherapy sessions he gradually began using his legs more, first his hind legs then finally his front legs, then definite steps on the treadmill in the water.

Finally on 1st February, 3 months after the onset of this condition Toby walked unaided for the first time, much to our delight and surprise. (Both the specialist and physiotherapist had both predicated he would probably walk in about 2 weeks a couple of days before!!) Since then he has improved daily but will still need time to build up his muscles and stamina and of course his damaged nerve ending will still be growing back and repairing themselves for many months to come. Nerve endings grow very slow, 1 to 3 mm per day!

The team of Neurologists at Melbourne University are of course attempting to discover the causes of Polyradiculoneuritis. In the US this condition is called Coon Hound paralysis as it is thought to be caused by exposure to racoon saliva. As we don't have racoons here in Australia there are many other theories that are being considered including a link to diet. We have been advised not to feed Toby any form of raw chicken, including his daily chicken neck as there is some suspicion that raw chicken could be a contributing factor. We must stress this is still a theory and has not been proven. They have found most of the dogs they see with Polyradiculoneuritis have been fed raw chicken or chicken necks.

While going through this experience we learnt a lot about ourselves and Toby. He has turned out to be the terrier we always thought he was, a true fighter who is continuing to surprise us and push himself daily. We also believe that Toby's recovery was accelerated due to our persistence and hard work with his daily physiotherapy. We look forward to watching our boy recover fully over the next few months.

.                                                  (Lyn and Greg Chapman)

Toby at Hydrotherapy

Walking after 3 months !!


Summary

Many thanks to Lyn and Greg Chapman for sharing Toby's story and thanks once more to those who are sending in Medical and Litter Reports. Please send any information on all types of medical conditions that affect Cairn Terriers as others are always interested in reading about anything that may help breeders and owners with their own cairns.

Please note that I am happy to talk to anyone who requires any help or support with their cairn's health issues or bile acid score issues. I may not know all the answers but may be able to guide you in the right direction.

Remember that eligible breeders are still entitled to claim the $10 rebate on tested litters. Simply report the litter results as usual to myself and then send copies of the pups' pedigrees only to Graeme Ferbrache to claim.

Lyn Barclay - 20 Outawood Rise, Gisborne, Victoria 3437
Email: lkbarclay@bigpond.com Tel: 03 5428 4739

Bile Acid Test Scores

LITTER TESTING 2014 - BILE ACID TEST SCORES

   LITTER NO.

Bile Acid Test Scores -  (where there are 2 scores, 1st is Fasting, 2nd is Post Prandial)

Scores considered high or requiring follow up by Laboratory concerned

Re-testing result

Outcome

146

53, 2, 4, 3, 8

53

2-21

Retested - all clear

147

83,14,4,14

 

 

All clear

148

6-92-12,2-21

2-21

1=17

All clear

149

2.8-5.6,1-6.2,1-12.9,1-2,1-14.32.4-.2,1-4.4

 

 

All clear

150

5, 7, 16,

 

 

All clear

151

3, 8, 4

33, 21

13, 7

All clear

152

3-16, 16-13, 1-28, 2-12,5-21

5-21,1-28

9 and 10

Retested All clear

153

1-14,1-17,3-19,1-15,2-13,2-20,1-15

 

 

All clear

154

49, 13, 13, 17, 15,11

49

3

Retested All clear

155

1,1

 

 

All clear

156

1,1

 

 

All clear

157

20,9,6,15

 

 

All clear

158

6,6,10,7,17,7

 

 

All clear

159

8,6,12,12,4,7,3,4

 

 

All clear

160

20,26,17,10,17,18,10

 

 

All clear

161

6,3

 

 

All clear

162

3,56,5,3

 

 

All clear

163

1,5,5

 

 

All clear

164

5

 

 

All clear

165

16,12,8,9,15,9,14

 

 

All clear

166

25,13,13

 

 

All clear

167

10,4,2,6,4

 

 

All clear

168

6,5,9,19,9,10

 

 

All clear

169

1,1,10

 

 

All clear

170

13,16,16,17,22,7,29

 

 

All clear

171

32,16

 

 

All clear

172

5,1,1,8,5,7

 

 

All clear

173

10,11,23,5,14

 

 

All clear

174

22,10,8,85

85

28

Retested All clear

175

1-4,2-7,0-9,4-12,0-4,1-11,1-6

 

 

All clear

176

11,20,15,9,25

 

 

All clear

177

177,9,6,8,7

 

 

All clear

178

2-81-7,2-9,3-8

 

 

All clear

179

30,21,15,17

 

 

All clear

180

777,12,5,8

 

 

All clear

181

1,5,1,2,1

 

 

All clear

     

Download Health Watch Committee Report Form

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